December news

pink flower cards from bottle branch blog

I’ve haven’t been blogging much, but I have been as busy as an elf over the past few weeks. I’ve made holiday wreaths, been working on new card designs, and added a few new cards in my etsy shop.

wreath december 2015 bottle branch blog

I’ve also done one fun holiday craft project with my younger children. So far. Hoping to do a few more and post on those a little later in the month. In the mean time, I’ll remind you that cards make a lovely holiday present and I’ve recently added an option to buy sets of cards in my shop. December is always a wild ride. Hang in there, my friends, and have fun!

cards as presents  bottle branch blog

More botanical photo cards: Autumn leaves

autumn leaf photo cards bottle branch blog

Well, now. This is turning into quite a boring blog. Here I am posting about new photo cards in my etsy shop. AGAIN.  These latest are botanically inspired patterns, ombre arrangements of autumn leaves. And they’re printed on the same soft, touchable card stock.

Its been so much fun to make these, that I’m working on more. The resizing, editing, and general fiddling does take longer than one might hope and so it has been keeping me quite busy. Not to mention, taking photos of the photo cards. Fun facts about this photo: (1) I’m left handed, so my right hand holding a pen looks awkward and hilarious to me. (2) I’ve had that silver pen since I got married – 19 years.(!) Its not the most practical pen, but it is pretty – perfect for a photo.

autumn leaf cards in use bottle branch blog

So, that’s all the news in my world of making things. I’m hoping to be back with something new and different soon. In the mean time, if you haven’t been to visit my etsy shop, I hope you’ll go take a look! And if you have already visited, and liked or even bought some items: thank you so much! I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your support!

Botanical photo cards

cards ready to write bottle branch blog

Its been quiet here, in my little corner of the internet. I’ve just been soooo busy. Yes, the usual tasks of motherhood – carpool, dinner, nagging – have kept me busy, but I’ve also been prepping more items for my etsy shop.

So, I’m delighted to post these new additions to my store – photo cards! Printed on soft, 130# card stock, that’s both acid free and Forest Stewardship Council certified, these cards turned out to be more lovely than I had hoped.

Each design is available in a separate etsy listing: autumn leaf ombré, hydrangea ombré, an array of summer flowers, and an array of green leaves.  I’ll shamelessly remind you that these cards would make a wonderful present for the avid gardener, plant lover, or anyone who just loves pretty things. I hope you’ll go take a look!

first four cards bottle branch blog

Making the most of summer abundance and instagram

plum island phototaker ephpyle

Every summer, I  develop an obsession with Instagram. Last August, I found myself rising early to catch the morning light, planning family outings to picturesque locales and filling my instagram feed with landscapes.

This summer, the photography passion has returned, but instead of landscapes, I’ve been focused on flowers and gardening. I’ve been snapping photos, editing photos, posting photos and dreaming of photos of flowers, plants, gardens.

gathered bouquet ephpyle

I cannot stop thinking about how to best capture my garden flowers in bouquets…

hydrangea and ferns ephpyle

… in styled scenes…

dramatic flowers ehpyle

…in dramatic lighting…

garden puttering ephpyle

or on site, in the garden.

I am astonished at how many hours I can fritter away snapping photos of flowers and plants, dreaming up creative projects, and quite honestly it makes my head spin. I’m happy to know I’m not alone, as, photographer Kim Klassen recently posted. Kim suggested it might be the longer days. I wonder if the lush, vibrant plant growth and bright summer light stir something within us, a primal need to make the most of the abundance of summer(For me, it might also be related to my children being off at camp for a few weeks, but that’s so… practical.)

My current instagram obsession has pushed some of my other projects to the back burner, but like all true summer romances, I know it can’t last. For one thing, I’m taking a printmaking class next week. That should help shift my focus if nothing else. Until then, see you on Instagram!

stewartia blossoms ephpyle

Giddy with garden flowers

hydrangeas.2015

I’m giddy about gardening right now. I feel like the expression “embarrassment of riches” was coined for me, for this afternoon, when I came home from Maryland, with an arm full of hydrangeas, and found my yard still filled with peonies.abundant flowers 2015

What lush abundance! What a thrill it was to to gather these flowers together. I also cut a few scabiosa, but my clippers never made it near the foxglove, mountain laurel, or other blooms that had popped open in my abscence. I put down those clippers and went to find my camera instead.

pale pink peony

I frittered away far too much time taking photos of flowers this afternoon, but it was fun. I hope you’ll enjoy these photos half as much as I enjoyed taking them.

blue hydrangeas

I’ll probably post a few more photos of these beauties in my instagram feed, because, like I said, I’m delighted, enamored, giddy with garden flowers. Join me there!

peonies and hydrangea

more pink peonies

 

Springtime garden dreaming

native withch havelJPG

Hello. It’s been a while.

Like everyone else I know, I’ve been busy. I’ve been attending year end performances, cleaning out the garage, transporting children, filling out permission slips, trying to get a squeaky faucet fixed, and so on. And, of course, I’ve also been busy in my garden.

I started seeds, watched them grow, carried them in and out of the house to harden them off, and now, just this week, planted them outside.

I pruned a dozen inkberry bushes and then luxuriated in the resulting clippings and their glossy foliage and even made a wreath from the cuttings. Sadly, the wreath was a failure, as it turned brown about 24 hours after I hung it in my house, and before I took a photos of the final product, but the project was fun.

I’ve been Instagraming the flowers that have emerged in my garden and trying not to get too excited in anticipation of the ones I hope will bloom soon. (You never know when tragedy may stike in the form of a garden pest.)

I’ve been puttering, planting, and scheming about how to keep the rabbits from eating everything that’s not contained in the fenced enclosure around my vegetable patch. I’ve been thinking about moving some ferns and what to plant in their place.

may apple flower

I’ve been admiring my mayapple which came back five times bigger this year than last. In short, I’ve been happily caught up planning and dreaming in my garden, caught up in the spirit of spring. Happily, I am now caught up here on my blog as well. Happy spring my friends! I hope you’re enjoying it as much as I am.

hot pink peony

July is the month for blueberries

beetsandcarrots

I haven’t been posting much about my garden this summer. In truth, its been a little disappointing. In June, rabbits chewed my zinnias down to twigs, munched my dahlias, and decapitated my yarrow. The spinach bolted before it had any leaves to harvest. I even managed to sow carrots over beets. I just didn’t have the heart to pull them out, so there they are, growing together.

And yet, I’m still making plans and planting. I’m still scheming and dreaming about what I’ll do next in my yard. Just this week, we’ve planted a blueberry patch with a few high bush and low bush blueberry plants, both native to New England.

When I worked as a biologist, I sometimes worked in a wetland* which was filled with blueberries during the month of July. On breaks, my co-workers and I would stand in our rubber boots, calf-deep in water and muck, and devour blueberries. We used to collect, bring home and freeze buckets of blueberries. We used to move noisily through the bog* lest we startle the black bear known to loiter and gobble blueberries by the pawful.

I’m not expecting any black bears to show up in my own little blueberry patch, but I am thrilled to be creating a naturalized thicket in my yard. I’m looking forward to puttering and tending these new shrubs. I hoping to enjoy some berries straight off the plant. That is, assuming the rabbits don’t get them first.

high bush blueberry
not quite ripe yet!

 

*technically it was a fen, a specific type of wetland, but I didn’t want to go all biology geek on you. Thats a side of me better left out of the blogosphere.

 

Small Moment: Germinating Seeds

seedlings leaning into the light

Last week, I planted a few seeds. Nothing special, a little basil, a little cilantro. Another way to fight the doldrums of  this long snowy winter.

I was delighted, earlier this week, when the cilantro seeds germinated. I found these seedlings, bright and green, stretching toward the sun, craving the same warmth and light that I do, oblivious to the bitter cold and the blanket of snow outside the window.

Watching tiny flecks of seeds transformed into tender living plants never fails to thrill me. The symbolizism is so obvious (new life, fresh start, etc.), it could seem tired. Germination is such a fundamental function of life, it could be easy to take for granted, but it rarely is. The inexplicable joy of a sprouting seed transcends cliche – this tiny miracle never fails to delight.

I’ll be starting more seeds for my vegetable garden in a few weeks – tomatoes, squash, cucumbers, zinnias. I’d like to plant a few metaphorical seeds as well – kernels of self sufficiency, resilience, and empathy in my children being highest on my list. I’m also working on the seeds of a few creative projects- sketches in a notebook, like a tiny plant curled up inside a seed, waiting to unfurl.

Wishing you all, dear readers, the best of luck in planting some seeds of your own, literal or metaphorical.

Weekend Doings

P.S. Linking up with Martha at Weekend Doings for: A picture… a moment. Click through to see her and other beautiful posts!

More is never enough

seed.packs

I’m so excited about my garden, despite the blanket of snow outside my windows. I’ve decided to try winter sowing this year and so I’ve been busy designing and dreaming, scheming and selecting seeds, and potting and planting them up.

In other years, I’ve planted early crops under a cold frame in March, but this year (and I’m a little late for it) I’ve stuck some seeds out in the snow. Here’s how: Save clear-topped plastic containers, order seeds, fill containers with damp soil, sow seeds, close containers (except for air and drainage holes) and place them in a sunny spot, outdoors. That’s the rough plan, anyway, and a reasonable one, at least, according to my internet search and wintersown.org.

planted.seeds

My internet search also yielded the quote, “More is never enough.”  More googling suggests Marty Rubin as the source of this quote. I have no idea who Marty Rubin is, or the context of the original quote, but feel that in the context of garden planning, it could not be more apt.

I am dreaming big right now. With spinach, arugula, water cress, broccoli, parsley, and a some foxglove now winter sown, I’ve also ordered three kinds of tomatoes, beans, squash, carrots, nasturtiums, zinnias and more. A whole colorful summer garden’s worth of seeds.

As I now consider adding shrubs, perennials, and roses, I realize that late winter garden dreaming is the correllary to seasonal garden ennui. Now is the time for ambitious garden planning. Now is the time when more is never enough.

winter.sown