Shop update: Summer flowers!

pink-hydrangea-party-cards-form-bottle-branch

Its been a while since I posted about my etsy shop, yet over the past month, I’ve been tweaking, editing, and adding new items. In particular, I’ve listed many new cards featuring summer flowers, because, as you could guess, summertime is the boom time for botanical photography.

In total, I’ve added three new sets of cards featuring poppies, calendula, goldenrod, anemone, cosmos, and of course, lots of hydrangeas, including the set of various hot pink hydrangea cards pictured above.

larkspur-ombre-card-by-bottle-branch

I’ve also added this ombré arrangment of larkspur flowers, which is available as an individual card, and as part of this set, which includes a couple of long time best sellers, cosmos, and a rainbow of garden flowers.

summer-2016-card-set-bottle-branch

In August, when late summer wild flowers came out in full force, I added a couple of wild flower cards.

wildflowers-card-close-up-bottle-branch

And added them to a set with arrangments of green leaves.

green-leaf-cards-by-bottle-branch

In truth, I’ve added too many to report on them all, so I hope you’ll go take a look. Maybe posting about summer flowers in October seems nonsensical but something tells me I’m not the only one who would like to hold on to the warmth, the flowers and the leaves; I’m not the only one who dreams of endless summer.

 

One way to dry Hydrangeas

cut hydrangeas

Despite my self-proclaimed garden ennui, I have been spending a little time in the past few weeks tidying up around my yard, trying to tame some of the wild late summer growth. As part of those efforts, I cut back some of my Hydrangea “Annabelle’. (This variety can take heavy pruning, or not – for more info look here.)

Rather than throw these cut stems out, or put them in water, I decided to try drying them.

I took an old copper planter, taped a grid  with floral tape to support the blooms. After stripping off the leaves, I dropped the stems in and stepped back, satistified, but uncertain of how they would look once dried.

Turns out, they look great, almost identical (see photo below). I’m not sure if this qualifies as a craft project, or a gardening project, but either way it was entirely satisfying.

Fresh cut hydrangeas, drying in the fireplace on the left. Three weeks later, fully dried, on the right.

Hydrangeas at home

hydrangea and dew 2

Hydrangeas have to be one of the more magnetic flowers to photograph. Two summers ago, when I was a more dedicated user of instagram, hydrangeas cropped up in my feed regularly. Yet, I didn’t have any growing in my yard.

Last summer, we finally added some in the form of Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’. I’ve always had a thing for white and greenish hydrangeas and we were trying to stick with mostly (North American) native plants. ‘Annabelle’ fit the bill on both counts. (Not that I don’t appreciate a hedge row of blue or pink H. macrophylla.)

I also knew I wanted this particular variety because I frequently pass a pair of ‘Annabelles’ in my neighborhood. I used to fantasize about taking a few blooms home with me. So, it was a thrill this morning to go to my own newly established plants and select a few stems to clip and bring inside. There they are – puffy, delicate, frothy, almost delicious-looking.

cut hydrangeas

With plenty of blooms left on the plants, I’ll get to watch the flowers as they weather and change over the rest of the summer, long life and variability being one of the beautiful aspects of most hydrangea blossoms. I’ll probably even cut a few to bring in and dry. Feels almost like having my cake and eating it too.

An old instagram shot of unknow hydrangea with aging blossoms turning pink at the edges.
An old instagram shot of aging hydrangea blossoms turning pink at the edges.